Scrapbooks

Babbott, Elizabeth (French). Scrapbook, 1910-1912
VC 1914
Elizabeth (French) Babbott was an avid scrapbooker, and created thorough volumes for each of her four years at Vassar, from 1910 through 1914. She preserved voluminous correspondence with her family, particularly her mother, father, and maternal grandmother. Her letters are expressive and affectionate, narrating her life at Vassar in detail. Throughout her time at Vassar, French was involved in the Christian Association, Students’ Association, and Philalethean Society, saving materials related to her activities. French was a theater enthusiast and included programs from concerts and plays she attended, both on and off campus. French also documents her academics, stays in the infirmary, and experiences living in North Hall [Milo Jewett House]. She describes participating in Vassar traditions, including Founder’s Day, Commencement, Class Day, Daisy Chain, Mohonk trips, the Senior Parlor, Sophomore and Junior parties, and bonding with 1916’s sister classes. She enjoyed close relationships with administrators, particularly Isabel Nelson Tillinghast (Assistant to the Lady Principal and VC 1878), Lady Principal Kendrick, and President James M. Taylor and his family. French led an active social life, with close knit groups of friends at Vassar and at home. She recounts their exploits in correspondence with friends and family, as well as including dance cards, valentines, place cards, invitations, and newspaper coverage of debuts, engagements, and weddings. French also details her interactions with young men (attending football games and parties at Yale, Princeton, and Amherst, inviting male guests to Vassar, throwing coed “house parties” at her home in New Jersey, describing her and friends’ negotiating romantic relationships) and saved her correspondence with male friends (including her future husband). This volume covers French’s first year, including Vassar freshman traditions, forming her friend group, acting in the Philalethean Society’s Fourth Hall Play (“The Taming of the Shrew”), participating in the Students’ Association’s Self-Government Committee, feelings about attending Vassar, her relationship with her family, hosting male friends at her home in New Jersey, adjusting to dorm life and furnishing her room, and stress about her academics.
Babbott, Elizabeth (French). Scrapbook, 1911-1912
VC 1914
Elizabeth (French) Babbott was an avid scrapbooker, and created thorough volumes for each of her four years at Vassar, from 1910 through 1914. She preserved voluminous correspondence with her family, particularly her mother, father, and maternal grandmother. Her letters are expressive and affectionate, narrating her life at Vassar in detail. Throughout her time at Vassar, French was involved in the Christian Association, Students’ Association, and Philalethean Society, saving materials related to her activities. French was a theater enthusiast and included programs from concerts and plays she attended, both on and off campus. French also documents her academics, stays in the infirmary, and experiences living in North Hall [Milo Jewett House]. She describes participating in Vassar traditions, including Founder’s Day, Commencement, Class Day, Daisy Chain, Mohonk trips, the Senior Parlor, Sophomore and Junior parties, and bonding with 1916’s sister classes. She enjoyed close relationships with administrators, particularly Isabel Nelson Tillinghast (Assistant to the Lady Principal and VC 1878), Lady Principal Kendrick, and President James M. Taylor and his family. French led an active social life, with close knit groups of friends at Vassar and at home. She recounts their exploits in correspondence with friends and family, as well as including dance cards, valentines, place cards, invitations, and newspaper coverage of debuts, engagements, and weddings. French also details her interactions with young men (attending football games and parties at Yale, Princeton, and Amherst, inviting male guests to Vassar, throwing coed “house parties” at her home in New Jersey, describing her and friends’ negotiating romantic relationships) and saved her correspondence with male friends (including her future husband). This volume covers French’s second year, including acting in the Philalethean Society’s production of “Beau Brummel,” serving on the Committee on Table Seating, being selected for the Daisy Chain, hosting a coed “house party,” her debut, attending dances with male friends, academics at Vassar, participating in a friend’s wedding, and her anxieties about attending college while her home friends are getting married. The scrapbook also gives a detailed account of blackface and a minstrel show at the Sophomore Party, including newspaper coverage, her descriptions in letters to her family, a poster for the event, and photographs of participating students (also see a program for the Good Fellowship Club performing a minstrel show in her scrapbook from 1912-1913 on page 36).
Babbott, Elizabeth (French). Scrapbook, 1912-1913
VC 1914
Elizabeth (French) Babbott was an avid scrapbooker, and created thorough volumes for each of her four years at Vassar, from 1910 through 1914. She preserved voluminous correspondence with her family, particularly her mother, father, and maternal grandmother. Her letters are expressive and affectionate, narrating her life at Vassar in detail. Throughout her time at Vassar, French was involved in the Christian Association, Students’ Association, and Philalethean Society, saving materials related to her activities. French was a theater enthusiast and included programs from concerts and plays she attended, both on and off campus. French also documents her academics, stays in the infirmary, and experiences living in North Hall [Milo Jewett House]. She describes participating in Vassar traditions, including Founder’s Day, Commencement, Class Day, Daisy Chain, Mohonk trips, the Senior Parlor, Sophomore and Junior parties, and bonding with 1916’s sister classes. She enjoyed close relationships with administrators, particularly Isabel Nelson Tillinghast (Assistant to the Lady Principal and VC 1878), Lady Principal Kendrick, and President James M. Taylor and his family. French led an active social life, with close knit groups of friends at Vassar and at home. She recounts their exploits in correspondence with friends and family, as well as including dance cards, valentines, place cards, invitations, and newspaper coverage of debuts, engagements, and weddings. French also details her interactions with young men (attending football games and parties at Yale, Princeton, and Amherst, inviting male guests to Vassar, throwing coed “house parties” at her home in New Jersey, describing her and friends’ negotiating romantic relationships) and saved her correspondence with male friends (including her future husband). This volume covers French’s junior year at Vassar. At the beginning of the year, French serves on the Committee for Receiving Freshmen and she documents her role and descriptions of the freshmen in her letters. Later, she attends the YWCA’s Eastern Student Conference at Silver Bay, saving materials from the conference and associated service organizations. French maintains her active social life, including a thorough (and humorous) account of the Vassar Junior-Sophomore Promenade, such as when she saw a night watchman at her dorm “standing at the open door with a club and in loud tones telling the suitors to 'go on home,’” and doing the forbidden “one-step” dance in front of the faculty (p. 28). She also attends events including a party at Amherst College, a house party in Connecticut, and a dinner for the Camp Fire Club of America. The volume preserves political materials from the presidential election, particularly in favor of Teddy Roosevelt, as well as press coverage of the political climate at Vassar (pp. 7-8).
Babbott, Elizabeth (French). Scrapbook, 1913-1914
VC 1914
Elizabeth (French) Babbott was an avid scrapbooker, and created thorough volumes for each of her four years at Vassar, from 1910 through 1914. She preserved voluminous correspondence with her family, particularly her mother, father, and maternal grandmother. Her letters are expressive and affectionate, narrating her life at Vassar in detail. Throughout her time at Vassar, French was involved in the Christian Association, Students’ Association, and Philalethean Society, saving materials related to her activities. French was a theater enthusiast and included programs from concerts and plays she attended, both on and off campus. French also documents her academics, stays in the infirmary, and experiences living in North Hall [Milo Jewett House]. She describes participating in Vassar traditions, including Founder’s Day, Commencement, Class Day, Daisy Chain, Mohonk trips, the Senior Parlor, Sophomore and Junior parties, and bonding with 1916’s sister classes. She enjoyed close relationships with administrators, particularly Isabel Nelson Tillinghast (Assistant to the Lady Principal and VC 1878), Lady Principal Kendrick, and President James M. Taylor and his family. French led an active social life, with close knit groups of friends at Vassar and at home. She recounts their exploits in correspondence with friends and family, as well as including dance cards, valentines, place cards, invitations, and newspaper coverage of debuts, engagements, and weddings. French also details her interactions with young men (attending football games and parties at Yale, Princeton, and Amherst, inviting male guests to Vassar, throwing coed “house parties” at her home in New Jersey, describing her and friends’ negotiating romantic relationships) and saved her correspondence with male friends (including her future husband).
Janish, Jeanne (Russell) and Lucile (Cross) Russell. Scrapbook, 1887-1938
VC 1896; VC 1924
This scrapbook contains materials from two alumnae: Lucile (Cross) Russell and her daughter Jeanne (Russell) Janish. Cross’ portion covers her high school education in Fairbury, Nebraska from 1887 to 1889, several years at the Jacksonville Female Academy (in Jacksonville, Illinois) through May 1892, and her four years at Vassar through her graduation with the class of 1896. During her time at Vassar, Cross saved concert programs (off-campus and by the Vassar Department of Music), theater programs (off-campus and by the Philalethean Society), a few pieces of correspondence with friends, songs, forms from the college, some academic materials, several photographs, and documents from traditions (including Trig Ceremonies, Founder’s Day, Class Day, Commencement, a class reunion, and Thanksgiving). Russell’s section of the scrapbook mainly covers her four years at Vassar from 1920 through 1924, beginning with documents from traditional freshman activities. Other traditions mentioned include the Mohonk trip, Junior Party, Halloween, Founder’s Day, Tree Ceremonies, Commencement, the Junior-Sophomore Debate, and the Daisy Chain. Russell preserved programs from plays and concerts, including some by the Philalethean Society and the Glee Club. During her time at Vassar, Russell participated in the Choir and saved a variety of materials from her experience. She was also a member of VC Granddaughters and served as a fire captain in both Olivia Josselyn House and Main. The end of the scrapbook relates to her joining Phi Beta Kappa, graduation from Vassar, and acceptance to study geology at Stanford University (she would be the first woman at Stanford to graduate with a master’s in the field).
Lapham, Ella C. Scrapbook, 1871-1878
VC 1876
This scrapbook covers Ella C. Lapham's (VC 1876) experiences as a student at Vassar, including traditions like Trig Ceremonies, Tree Ceremonies, Class Day, Founder's Day, Commencement, Professor Maria Mitchell's Dome Party, and Thanksgiving. She also saved programs from concerts and events by the Cecilia Society and the Vassar School of Music, among other groups. Lapham preserved her correspondence with other students and invitations she received. Notably, she included a poem entitled "The Japanese Princesses," which contains racist depictions of the first Japanese Vassar students' English language skills and warns that they are thieves who should not be trusted. The same poem appears in Bertha Keffer's (VC 1876) 1876 diary, available through the Vassar Digital Library at https://digitallibrary.vassar.edu/islandora/object/vassar%3A1947. After leaving Vassar, Lapham was active in the Alumnae Association and helped to fundraise for the college. Her scrapbook contains correspondence with alumnae and faculty, Alumnae Association meeting information, and notes on the lives of other members of the class of 1876. In particular, she kept track of classmates' weddings and deaths through the early 1880s.
Mansfield, Adelaide (Claflin). Scrapbook, 1893-1897
VC 1897
This scrapbook covers Adelaide (Claflin) Mansfield’s years at Vassar, from 1893 through 1897. She provided materials about Vassar traditions such as Thanksgiving, Founder’s Day, the Sophomore Party, the Senior Parlor, Halloween, Trig Ceremonies, Tree Ceremonies, Commencement, Field Day, the Mohonk trip, Junior-Senior Excursions, Class Day, and songs for a variety of occasions. She also described protests over the College’s decision to stop giving Washington’s Birthday as a holiday. Claflin pasted photographs of campus into the volume as well. During her time at Vassar, Claflin participated in the Young Women’s Christian Association (saving documents from prayer meetings, receptions, and attending the Convention of the Young Women's Christian Association of the State of New York in 1895) and the VC Teachers’ Club, debated for T. and M., and enjoyed student athletics like basketball and the annual tennis tournament. She also included programs from plays and concerts on and off campus, including by the Philalethean Society, Exoteric Society, and Glee Club. Claflin preserved memories of her social life at Vassar, such as visiting cards, invitations, place cards, poems, valentines and correspondence from friends, and friends’ wedding announcements (the end of the scrapbook lists some engagements, marriages, births, and deaths for her class). She also saved receipts for board and tuition, laundry, and her subscription to the Miscellany. In terms of her academics at Vassar, Claflin kept examinations, notes, and her class schedules. She included some correspondence with librarians, professors (such as Susan B. Franklin, Lucy Maynard Salmon, and Abby Leach), and Lady Principal Kendrick. She transcribed a lecture on rhetoric by Professor Manuel J. Drennan as well. Claflin also depicted Vassar’s political climate during the presidential election of 1896.
Ross, Caroline (Barnes). Scrapbook, 1901-1905
VC 1905
This scrapbook covers Caroline (Barnes) Ross’ four years at Vassar, from 1901 to 1905. She included documents from campus events (such as the Sophomore Party, Mohonk trip, Dome Party, commencement, Class Day, Founder’s Day, debates, opening the Senior Parlor, and the dedication of the Chapel), plays (particularly by the Philalethean Society), concerts, academics and examinations, and her social life both on and off campus (dance cards, place cards, and invitations). Barnes was popular at Vassar and preserved notes, poems, and valentines sent among her friends, as well as their correspondence during her stays in the Infirmary and a medical leave. She participated in the Christian Association and included programs from their receptions, prayer meetings, and courses in Bible Study and Mission Study. Barnes’ mother also attended Vassar [Lucy (Sellers) Barnes (VC 1875)] and Barnes was active in the V. C. Granddaughters Society. She was a talented athlete, serving as president of the Athletic Association during her senior year, and saved newspaper clippings about her breaking campus records. She provided information about the annual tennis tournament, class basketball teams, and Field Day, such as programs and coverage by external newspapers.
Wing, Lucy (Madeira). Scrapbook, 1892-1896
VC 1896
This scrapbook covers Lucy (Madeira) Wing’s four years at Vassar, from 1892 through 1896, and a few events she attended as an alumna. She includes materials from concerts, plays (particularly by the Philalethean Society), and art exhibitions both on and off campus. During her senior year, Madeira organized a benefit performance of “The Russian Honeymoon” by Vassar student actors in Washington, D.C. She also documents Vassar traditions including the Trig Ceremonies, Mohonk trip, Tree Ceremonies, Thanksgiving and Halloween at Vassar, Class Day, Senior Parlor, and Commencement. Madeira was involved in the Young Women’s Christian Association, and saved materials from its activities and information about settlement houses. She also includes her academic experiences and her examinations. Madeira also preserves valentines and correspondence with Vassar friends, social invitations and event programs, visiting cards, and interactions with friends at other women’s colleges (Wellesley and Smith). After graduating from Vassar, Madeira would found the Madeira School in Washington D.C. (now located in McLean, Virginia) in 1906.
Wyman, Anne (Southworth). Scrapbook, 1878-1882
VC 1882
This scrapbook is primarily devoted to Anne (Southworth) Wyman’s four years at Vassar between 1878 and 1882, but also covers some of her experience as an alumna. Southworth documents Vassar traditions including Thanksgiving, Trig Ceremonies, Founder’s Day, Class Day, Tree Ceremonies, Senior Auction, Dome Parties, Junior-Senior Excursions, Commencement, and Washington’s Birthday. She preserves programs from concerts (such as those by the Vassar School of Music) and plays (including by the Exoteric and Philalethean Societies). Southworth also participates in Clio and the Livy Club. She includes academic materials, such as examinations and astronomy notes. She preserves correspondence, poems, and jokes with her friends at Vassar, some of which reference Southworth’s desire to pursue a career in law. Southworth also saves invitations, place cards, wedding invitations and announcements of Vassar students, and news clippings about events at Vassar. She includes her correspondence with two Japanese students--mainly Sutematsu “Stematz” Yamakawa (VC 1882) but also with Shige Nagai (VC Spec [Music] 1878-1881)--and references them to others. For example, Vassar librarian Fanny Borden wrote to her about an exhibition on Sutematsu Yamakawa in 1932 [see page 9]. Southworth also includes materials from professors (such as Maria Mitchell) and Lady Principal Julia A. Ray.