Vassar College Digital Library

Stem, Sarah M.| to family, May 14, 1871:

Abstract
VC 1872
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Details
Identifier
vassar:25007,,,VCL_Letters_Stem_Sarah-M_1872_007,Box 73
Date
May 14, 1871
Type
Extent
1 item
Rights
For more information about rights and reproduction, visit http://specialcollections.vassar.edu/policies/permissionto.html
Creator

 


: VCLLettersStemSarahM1872007001
Vassar College N.Y.
May 14th, 1871.
My dear Allie,
Your letter quite surprised
me by its prompt appearance
and remarkable length. Scarcity of paper
seems to have an inspiring effect upon
you. Speaking of paper, don't you think
that this is a lovely tint? I am writing
on it that you may go to the bookstore
and see if they have any like it, for I
know you want some. I want to get some
when I come home. They call it Auburn.
Annie Is a young girl whom I used
to know at Miss Moore's school. She was
a beautiful girl and very popular. I believe
she afterwards moved to Fairmont. I said
poor girl, merely because I should consider
any one so who married Charlie Norton.
I can't endure him or Dr. Price either.
Do you consider me a goose for not knowing
that sherry wine would not cure dyspepsla?

 


: VCLLettersStemSarahM1872007002
Well I have been told a great many times that
any kind of wine would relieve dyspepsia
so I naturally gave such power to sherry wine,
especially as my medicine tasted very much
like sherry. I thought that that was what
Jay Butler meant about dyspepsia, but
I hadn't any idea what Charlie Saddler meant.
By the way, how did he, Saddler, happen to be at
Aunty's? Weren't you amazed to hear
of Lena Mill's engagement? I thought that
If Mr. Ayers ever married anybody, that he
would marry Julia Radcliffe, perhaps Jacky
wouldn't cause he couldn't. I am not
surprised at Hannah Marshall and Judge Sloans.
Is there any rumor, when their wedding is to
come off?
Mollie Gale did write me that she
had invited eight bridesmaids, and then
proceeded to mention those who had accepted,
which were Ella W. Lizzie C. Llbbie H. Effie
S. and myself. She said nothing about
groomsmen, and I naturally thought that
there were not to be any. Judge then of
my amazement when I saw the long string
of names which you sent me. I think
it would be a great deal prettier to have
eight bridesmaids without groomsmen
don't you? I wonder who she will put
me with. Spencer Gale likely. I thought
that Kittle Cooke was in Europe. Didn't
she and her mother go to London with

 


: VCLLettersStemSarahM1872007003
Mr. Henry D. and Harry? I supposed that the whole
family went, and if so, it seems a long way to
come for Mollie's wedding.
She also told me that the bridemaids were
all to wear white tarleton, with no color and no
[color] vails. Rather hard on poor black me, isn't It?
What a pity it was you didn't see more of
Andy Hunker's elegant overcoat. How did he
happen to be in Sandusky, and did he look
natural?
About Liv. Hubbard, I shouldn't wonder a
bit if he had been rusticated. Don't speak of it,
but I am going to find out.
If it had not been so pleasant today,
and also if the Religious Inquiry Society had
not met tonight, you should have had
a longer letter; but right in the midst of
my letter, the girls insisted that it was
so lovely, that we must go out and
walk. So we went out and came back
with our hands full of apple blossoms and
violets. There are the greatest quantity of wild
fruit trees, and wild flowers around here,
than I ever saw before in my life.
I went to Religious Inquiry meeting, because
Prof. Backus was announced to speak. As I am
perfectly devoted to him, and he never fails
to give us something worth hearing, I was
naturally anxious to go. He gave us a funny
description of his experience in a negro

 


: VCLLettersStemSarahM1872007004
church in the south, where the people were all jumping up and down In the aisles, singing and gesticulating while he was talking. It is his opinion that they are not all saints yet.
He told us the surprising fact, that the Cherokee nation of Indians sent more men into the Union Army during the last war, that is in proportion to their population than the State of Massachusetts, which sent more than any other state in the Union. He also said that in proportion to its population, the Cherokee nation was the richest in the world! But perhaps this Missionary lecture may not please, any way I will not occupy more space with it now.
Mother, I suppose has told you that I want to go home with Mame Taylor for a few days, if I can get away from here a few days, won't that be grand? They live up on the Hudson during the summer, just a little ways from here. Strawberries will then be in full blast. Her father will be west, and she and her brothers will run the house. I came near forgetting to acknowledge the receipt of my box. I have the sacque
to my white pique here, so the dresses are all right. The only thing is, I am afraid my newest one is pretty short, and I am sure the overskirt is decidedly old fashioned. I will have to have a general making over time when I come home. The retiring bell has rung, so

 


: VCLLettersStemSarahM1872007005
I shall have to say goodnight. I hope you will answer this as
promptly as you did my last one, and also that paper will be scarce,
if it has the same effect upon you as before
Lovingly
Sallie
You remember the Sophomore trial of their Trigonometry which I spoke
to you about? They have had the proceedings published. I will send you
a copy.
S.