Vassar College Digital Library

Barnes, Lucy | to Howard, Sep. 21, 1870:

Abstract
VC 1875
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Details
Identifier
vassar:24149,,Box 64,VCL_Letters_Barnes_Lucy_1875_001
Date
Sep. 21, 1870
Type
Extent
1 item
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: VCLLettersBarnesLucy1875001001
Vassar College
September 21st, 1870

Dear Howard-

I received your very interesting note the other morning while I was studying my latin but as I now have graduated from school and entered College- I had an opportunity to read it as soon as I got it, for so long as we know our lessons it makes no difference when we learn them. It seems so funny to me that we do not go to school at 9 o'clock and sit at our desks until two. All the time I have a teacher with me is when I recite my lessons - the first which is algebra I say at

 


: VCLLettersBarnesLucy1875001002
10 1/2 o'clock and when it is over I go back to my room and do as I please until twelve and then I say my latin which I get through with just in time for my dinner and at 3 1/2 I say another latin lesson for l am studying it double hard this year.

Every day we have the greatest fun at the table about eating, for we all like the brown bread so much bettor than white and we keep the poor girl on the go the whole time, and the fun of it is that she can't save her steps and bring a great quantity at once for she is only allowed just so much. At dinner all of us try and guess what we are going to have for dessert but we very rarely guess right for they have

 


: VCLLettersBarnesLucy1875001003
the queerest things that I never heard of before such as whole peaches with the skins on made up in a great big pie in a dish about a foot deep. The old girls say that is nothing to equal the "Yellow Dish" a name they have given something that we have not yet seen.

Yesterday I was out walking (for we are all obliged to exercise an hour a day In the open air) and when I was coming home I happened to look a little to the right and there I saw a runaway. It was a carriage turning over and over and the horse was running at its full speed. Miss Raymond (Professor's daughter) was in but did not stay there long. She was not hurt very badly but bruised her head some. It was

 


: VCLLettersBarnesLucy1875001004
the third time she had been run away with by that horse, so I judge she won't try it very soon again. Oh Howard you have no idea how good they try to make us here - we actually are obliged to pray, eleven times on Sunday and nine every other day. We also are trying to make each other more orderly by having a penny to pay for every little thing we lay down out of place in the parlor. We have a piece of paper with all the girls names on it who are in our parlor and put a stroke down for each thing - and when we get a good many then we are going to buy something real pretty for the room. You must let the rest of the family know that I am flourishing for it is impos-

 


: VCLLettersBarnesLucy1875001005
sible for me to write so often now, since we have begun to study.
Darkness is over shadowing these pages, so I must stop. With love to you all, I am-
As ever,
Lucy